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The Science Behind Tarpon

May 4, 2012
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www.helterskeletons.com
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Pat Ford
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Leptocephalus larvae have long, slender bodies and very low energy requirements, and they avoid predation by being transparent. Cedric Guigand
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Tim Pask/Pat Ford/David Magnum/Sam Root
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Research on the distribution of vision cells around a tarpon’s eye revealed their eyesight is keenest in upward and forward-looking regions. David Magnum
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David Magnum
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Sunrise is an excellent time to fish for tarpon because the recent lack of photosynthesis forces them to roll more frequently to meet their oxygen demand. Pat Ford
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It’s still unclear why tarpon engage in daisy-chaining behavior (pictured above). This was originally believed to be related to spawning, but that theory was debunked by observations of daisy-chaining juvenile tarpon. The working hypothesis is that the behavior decreases the risk of predation. Pat Ford
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