Tripletail

Tripletail will readily hit live baits, lures or flies, put up a dogged fight, and often unexpectedly take to the air.

Atlantic tripletail are surely among top contenders on any angler’s list of weird fish. With a mottled brown, compressed body they have a habit of lying on their sides on the surface, looking like a big floating leaf, their noses tight to a trap float, piling or weedline.

Pelagic by nature, they are common seasonally in tropical and semitropical waters, in the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Sight-fishing for them is the most common strategy, and they’ll readily hit live baits, lures or flies, put up a dogged fight, and often unexpectedly take to the air. 


Light tackle or medium casting tackle is perfectly matched to most tripletail, which average 10 to 12 pounds; though big ones, up to 30 or 40 pounds, may demand 30-pound line to prevent them tangling in structure and breaking off. Their firm, white flesh is tops on the table and suitable for many recipes.