Spoon Fed

Cave's Wobbler - a revolutionary pattern that redfish can't resist

Spoon Fed

Spoon Fed

When the Wobbler is tied perfectly, it takes on more of a peanut shape, and it’s that shape that makes it wobble. When tying the fly, slide the Mylar tubing over the hook shank, and tie it off the lead end at the bend of the hook. Coat the inside of the tube with epoxy and then tie off the open end at the eye. For the fly to work properly, both sides of the Mylar have to touch, and there can be absolutely no air pockets inside. If you wish, you could use UV acrylic on the outside after you epoxy the fly for better durability.

“When the epoxy is just starting to heat up and set, I pinch the materials with my thumbs and middle fingers and pull out the front and back of the Mylar, the back just a little bit more than I do in the front. It makes the water flow through there an odd way, and that’s got something to do with the action of the fly. The fly will work fine if you don’t do that, but the peanut shape looks better and it wobbles better too,” Cave says. Initially the Wobbler was developed for redfish, but Cave has received numerous reports over the years of the fly taking everything from Northern pike to peacock bass. When targeting redfish, cast it near but not in the school of fish and let it drop. A lot of times you don’t even have to strip; the fish pick the fly up as it flutters down. If you don’t get a strike on the first drop, strip long and slow.

During the last 20-plus years, this popular pattern has been tied in several colors and sizes, not to mention countless tail material variations. Although everyone has their favorite combination, the original pattern is sold through Umpqua dressed with gold Mylar tubing on hooks size 2 and 2/0. A sparse bunch of orange bucktail and a few strands of gold crystal flash shape the tail. Cave will tell you that the original version is his favorite, but he still ties a special version with a split tail that looks a lot like a crayfish — his go-to for smallmouths