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In Photos:Gulf Fly-Fishing Grab Bag

The nearshore waters off the Gulf of Mexico can test the tackle and technique of any fly-angler

July 17, 2012
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Scott Sommerlatte
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Scott Sommerlatte
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When jack crevalle are in feeding mode, they will stop at nothing to run down their prey. When one takes your fly — hold on! Scott Sommerlatte
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Scott Sommerlatte
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Scott Sommerlatte
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When you fish the nearshore of the Gulf, keep your eyes open for activity. If you don’t see anything in open water, the oil rigs are a very good bet most of the time. Scott Sommerlatte
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Cobia are generally easy to approach, and it usually takes only one well-placed cast and A couple of quick strips to entice one. Scott Sommerlatte
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Scott Sommerlatte
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Gulf anglers often get opportunities at tarpon along the beachfront, as the fish come through on their way to and from the Mississippi annually. Scott Sommerlatte
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Throughout the world of saltwater fly-fishing, there are many species that don’t get the respect they deserve. Hardly any are more overlooked than the lowly marauder of the brine, the shark. However, what few realize is that, from the smallest bonnetheads of the Florida Keys to the largest bull sharks of Texas — sharkin’ is some of the best sport offered to fly-anglers. Scott Sommerlatte
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