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How do you tie flies for striper in Chesapeake Bay?

The "less is more" theory needs refinement when tying Clouser Minnows.

July 23, 2003
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Q Joshua Fine says: I am interested in tying ClouserMinnows with artificial materials (sparkle flash and Super Hair) touse for stripers on the Chesapeake Bay. I understand that “less ismore” when determining the amount of material to use in making thefly. But how do you figure how much is enough when accounting forcloudy water and finer materials?

The length and amount of Super Hair, Unique Hair,etc., is determined by the size of the local baitfish you aretrying to imitate. As for the type and amount of flash, I suggestusing Mylar flash material, which is flat, rather than the twistedtype, which is stiffer and doesn’t move as well on a slow retrieve.When the water is dingy or on overcast days, I tend to use moreflash. In fact, leaving a little flash extending beyond the body(Dan Blanton calls it a “flash tail”) often will draw more strikes.The clearer the water, the less flash I use.

There is another trick I like – which works only with Mylarstrands that are flat, not twisted – that adds more action. Allowsome strands to extend beyond the tail of the fly, and place thestrands between the thumbnail and the first finger. Then firmlypress the thumbnail into the strands as you draw the thumb towardthe strand ends. This forms little curly tails in the Mylar – muchlike using a pair of scissors on gift ribbon.

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