Spotted Seatrout

Seatrout usually sought in inshore waters, over grass flats or shell bars where they school and feed.

Seatrout generally refers to either weakfish, ranging from New England to Central Florida, or spotted seatrout, from New Jersey to the Florida peninsula and throughout the Gulf of Mexico. Scattered black spots along the body and a prominent mouth surely resemble freshwater species from which “specks” draw their common name.


Spotted seatrout average from a couple of pounds up to four or five, with 10 pounds as the trophy grail, and specimens have been caught that top 17 pounds. Central Florida is especially renowned for larger trout. They are usually sought in inshore waters, over grass flats or shell bars where they school and feed. Live shrimp are top baits, though strips and cut bait work well, as do plastic-tailed lures. A popular strategy simulates feeding by splashing a popping cork set a couple feet above the bait or lure, across the surface on light spinning tackle. Quality as table fare is very good.