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Mississippi authorities certify seven saltwater sportfishing records

New records for Fly-fishing and Conventional Tackle

August 22, 2008
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Six anglers recently set seven new Mississippi saltwater sportfishing records. The Commission on Marine Resources certified the six conventional tackle records and one fly-fishing record during its July 15 meeting.

Conventional Tackle:

·   Tommy O’Brien of Pascagoula broke the state record for yellowtail snapper and set a new record for yellowfin grouper. O’Brien caught the 6-pound, 0.32-ounce snapper June 25, breaking the previous record of 4 pounds, 9.92 ounces set in June 2005. The yellowfin grouper, caught June 15, weighed 3 pounds, 9.85 ounces.

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·  Thomas Hunt of Lucedale set a new record on June 1 with a spotfin hogfish weighing 10.4 ounces.

·  Joe Davis Sr. of Lucedale broke the striped burrfish state record June 7. The burrfish weighed 1 pound, 4 ounces, surpassing the previous record of 1 pound, 3.2 ounces set in June 2006.

·   Hyler Krebs of Pascagoula broke the state record June 8 for Atlantic cutlassfish, weighing 2 pounds, 2.2 ounces, surpassing the state record of 1 pound, 4.48 ounces set in July 2006.

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·  Carlton Neal of Pascagoula broke the state record with a blue runner, weighing 7 pounds, 14.99 ounces, surpassing the previous record of 7 pounds, 2.08 ounces set in June 2005.

Fly-fishing:

·  Doug Borries of Ocean Springs broke the state saltwater fly-fishing record June 26 for gray snapper, with a weight of 5 pounds, 12.65 ounces, breaking the previous record of 2 pounds, 7.52 ounces set in June 2002.

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The Mississippi Department of Marine Resources is dedicated to enhancing, protecting and conserving marine interests of the state by managing all marine life, public trust wetlands, adjacent uplands and waterfront areas to provide for the optimal commercial, recreational, educational and economic uses of these resources consistent with environmental concerns and social changes. Visit the DMR online at dmr.ms.gov http://dmr.ms.gov/> .

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