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August ’09 Reader Tips

Some of the latest tips from our readers...

July 29, 2009
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Two In One
With all the gear anglers can accumulate these days, tackle bags can get heavy, causing them to be quite cumbersome. In an effort to shave off a little weight from my gear bag, I came up with a solution to minimize the amount of sinkers I carry. The method is very simple and doesn’t call for any major tools. I took a standard pyramid sinker that I use for surf-fishing and drilled a small hole in the bottom. Now I have a sinker that serves two purposes and only have to carry the one modified version. I attach the sinker by the wire loop on the flat end when fishing in the surf, and when drift-fishing, simply attach the sinker to my line through the pointy (modified) end.

Paul Genovese
Lavallette, New Jersey

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Easy Organizing**
This is the easiest rod storage system I have ever used. It takes up less room then most storage devices, and it can fit just about anywhere, along any wall. The bottom is constructed out of either a one-by-four or a two-by-four. Drill 178-inch holes every 4 inches on center for the butt end of your rods. Place the base on the bottom of a wall, measure up about 44 to 47 inches and draw a level line. Glue and staple a Velcro strip (the same length as your base) along your level line. For each rod you plan on storing, cut a 3-inch strip of Velcro (opposite from what’s on the wall). Place your rod butt in your predrilled holes and fix a Velcro strip around each rod to the Velcro strip on the wall. This storage system takes very little time to make and is an easy and effective way to get and stay organized.

David Jones
Northfield, New Jersey

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Open Your Eyes**
If you are like me and like to replace the treble hooks that come on many large lures and jigs with J or circle hooks, you’ve probably run into the problem of opening the eyes of hooks with pliers. Here’s a tip that will allow you to safely alleviate this frustration. I take my replacement hook and position it against something solid (a piece of scrap wood or a brick). Next, I find a nail that has a diameter slightly larger than the eye of my hook. Place the nail in the eye against the solid object and give it a couple of solid whacks. The eye should open right up, allowing you to easily attach it to your chosen lure or jig. To finish up your customized lure, grab your favorite pliers, give the eye a good squeeze and you are back in business.

Vic Cresenzo
Reidsville, North Carolina

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