Casting Sink-Tips

Many anglers swear by the shooting-head systems and many prefer the one-piece lines. The primary complaints about both systems are a perception of "hinging"at the junction of the weighted and non-weighted portions of the lines.

Many anglers swear by the shooting-head systems and many prefer the one-piece lines. The primary complaints about both systems are a perception of "hinging"at the junction of the weighted and non-weighted portions of the lines. This "problem"disappears once anglers learn the proper way to cast the heavy lines. The first 30 feet or so of the fast sinking lines often weigh as much as your car keys. Imagine trying to false cast a dry line with a set of car keys at the end of the line. It simply can't be done.
The proper way to cast the heavily weighted lines is to rollcast out all but a foot or two of the sinking portion. The junction of the sinking and floating portions should be somewhere between the tip and the second guide. Strip off an appropriate amount of the running line and hold the excess line in big open loops, or pile it on the deck of your boat or at your feet in the water. With the sinking section straight in front of you, briskly lift it up and power it behind you. As the sinking portion straightens out behind you and begins to load the rod, bring your cast forward with sufficient force to shoot the head and floating line as far as you wish. With a bit of practice you can shoot as much as 60 feet of line with ease. Experts like Jim Teeny can easily shoot the entire line with no false casts.