Rushing a Cast

Q: I've noticed that when I am practicing, my loops are tight and neat. I'm doing the speed-up-and-stop and not hurrying. Any suggestions on how to transfer that good technique to real-life situations when the albies start blitzing or you see a permit or tarpon daisy chaining? Is it simply a matter of fishing more often?

Q: I've noticed that when I am practicing, my loops are tight and neat. I'm doing the speed-up-and-stop and not hurrying. Any suggestions on how to transfer that good technique to real-life situations when the albies start blitzing or you see a permit or tarpon daisy chaining? Is it simply a matter of fishing more often?

Jeff Salkin

A: We all have the same problem. Rush a cast and things fall apart. A common fault is that on the final cast extra effort with the rod hand opens the loop and adds shock waves. The trick is to "try" to stay calm and not rush.
 Imagine you are false casting and on the final false cast let it go. The difference between rushing a cast and taking your time is only seconds but it makes a world of difference in performance. No fly-fisherman I know is ever completely immune to this problem - and maybe that's good.