Around the Docks in Bermuda

Various happenings and news from around the island of Bermuda

bermuda island info

bermuda island info

History, heritage — and a whole lot more! There’s something for everyone in Bermuda’s premier tourist destination.

The principle base for the British Royal Navy from the American revolution until the 1950s, the Royal Naval Dockyard was reborn in the 1980 as the original buildings were put back into service as a premier leisure destination with shops, restaurants, businesses and a pedestrian mall, all served by a public ferry system connecting to Hamilton and St. Georges. Pier 41 Marina on the northwest side of the North Basin is a modern full-service marina tucked behind the passenger ship berths at the West End area of the island.

Beautifully restored historical buildings, surrounded by sparkling crystal waters at the western tip of the island, provide a spectacular backdrop to everything from great food and shopping to water sports, magnificent museums, working arts and crafts studios and even the chance to swim with dolphins! If you don’t wish to walk, there is a free train shuttle to transport you around all the sights.

With its two 100-foot towers, the Clocktower Mall is a Dockyard landmark. Built in the 19th century as administration offices for the British Royal Navy, its beautifully restored cobblestone floors and handsome wrought-iron pillars are now home to an exciting array of restaurants, boutiques and shops. The Clocktower Mall is open daily from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m., and until 8 p.m. on Monday evenings when Destination Dockyard is on.

Destination Dockyard is a fun-filled street festival where you can start the evening with happy hour at the Frog & Onion Pub from 5.:30 p.m. and then wander over to the lawn for a variety of live entertainment, shopping, children’s activities, local arts and crafts, Bermudan and ethnic foods and a performance of the Bermudan Gombeys dancing in their age-old tradition. This is a fun night ashore for all, visitors and locals, between 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. on the North Lawn every Monday evening from June 11 through Sept. 17. In addition, the Beating of the Retreat on Monday, June 11, opens the season and on Monday, Sept. 17, closes the season.

There’s a world of wonderful shopping and dining in the Royal Naval Dockyard, and all within walking distance of the ferry or bus stop. From jewelry, fashion and local crafts to rum cakes and glassware, the Dockyard’s stores are a treasure trove awaiting discovery.

There is no excuse to go hungry in the West End, because you will find an abundance of restaurants and cafés, even a traditional Olde English Pub. There’s something to suit every taste in the Dockyard! Visit the National Museum of Bermuda and explore 500 years of local history and culture, displayed in military buildings of the 10-acre Keep citadel, including the award-winning restored Commissioner’s House. Discover bastions, cannons, shipwreck artifacts, local watercraft and maritime art all in Bermuda’s largest fort, which is also home to Dolphin Quest.

Snorkel Park Beach is conveniently located just a few minutes’ walk from the ships. This hidden cove is nestled under the historic walls of the National Museum and provides easy access to excellent snorkeling. This is also the only beach that offers a full array of water-sports equipment including snorkel gear, kayaks, pedal boats and Jet Skis, along with scuba tours power snorkeling, chaise lounges, cabanas and day beds. There is also a full-service bar and restaurant, which often has live entertainment.

Bermuda Nixes Foreign Longliners
The Bermudan government has determined that it will not be licensing foreign vessels to fish longlines in Bermuda's 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone. The announcement was made in March by Minister of Environment, Planning and Infrastructure Strategy Marc Bean.

Earlier this year Premier Paula Cox announced that the government was assessing the feasibility of establishing a licensing regime for commercial vessels fishing within Bermuda’s EEZ. The controversy spawned by the assessment led to the eventual announcement that longliner access to Bermuda’s tract of Atlantic waters is not in the nation’s best interest.

“These discussions were initiated because of government’s concern regarding the real possibility that foreign-flagged fishing vessels are fishing in Bermuda waters illegally and may have been doing so for many years,” said Minister Bean.

“After further examination and consultation with technical staff ... the government has opted to assess ways to enhance enforcement capabilities so that illegal fishers can be apprehended.”

Minister Bean said the government will continue to encourage local fishermen who wish to engage in offshore fishing.

“The Department of Environmental Protection has developed terms and conditions for offshore fishing that adhere to current best practices aimed at minimizing by-catch, and the government is confident that offshore fishing can be conducted by local fishermen in Bermuda’s waters in an environmentally responsible manner,” said the minister.

—Source: Royal Gazette Bermuda