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June 30, 2008

Lucky Virginia Beach tackle shop sees some big fish

They've registered so many fish for Virginia State and IGFA World Record that anglers stopping by their shop in Virginia Beach often have something to celebrate.

The owners of Long Bay Pointe Bait and Tackle www.longbaypointbaitandtackle.com should stock Champaign between the boxes of frozen squid and packs of ballyhoo.  In the last few years, they've registered so many fish for Virginia State and IGFA World Record that anglers stopping by their shop in Virginia Beach often have something to celebrate. 

"We've weighed-in more records than I can count," says shop co-owner Captain Steve Wray.  He recalls the 525 pound Thresher Shark that set a Virginia State Record, and the 22 pound 9 ounce tog that set a 2-pound test line-class World Record along with almost a dozen World Record blueline tilefish.  A big reason for the spike in records is tied to the dock in front of the store.  The Jil Carrie is a 42 foot Chesapeake Bay Boat that Captain Jim Brincefield www.captjim.com runs to the deep for big grouper and tilefish.  More than once he's returned with a world record.  His last entry is a 4-pound 3-ounce blackbelly rosefish caught by William Davis of Forestville, Maryland. Davis caught his fish from at the edge of the Norfolk Canyon in over 500 feet of water.  Captain Steve Wray credits convenience and accuracy as the reasons so many anglers choose his shop to weigh-in their fish.  Captain Jim Brincefield credits Steve Wray as the reason he brings his record fish to Long Bay Point. 

"He's one of the most experienced captains in the area and he shares all of his information with anyone," Brincefield says, adding that many of the Jil Carrie's own records are attributed to information obtained from Captain Wray.  "It takes a lot of time spent fishing with a lot of lines in the water," Brincefield says, "that and a lot of luck."