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August 31, 2012

Dr. Todd Kuhn

Salt Water Sportsman
Hurricane Isaac pummeled the Gulf Coast with winds in excess of 75 miles-per-hour, while dumping more than 20-inches of rain. As locals begin the long slog of drying-out and patching things up, the fishing beat goes on. Captain Sonny Schindler, of Shore Thing Charters in Diamondhead, MS shared his “post-hurricane pattern” with us.
Salt Water Sportsman
Abandoned oil rigs are a rich, environmental resource when “reefed.” Reefing is the practice of toppling these superstructures after subsequently plugging wells, decommissioning platforms, and blanking pipelines. Once sunk, the empty hull provides prime eco-habit for marine life.However, a quagmire of governmental red tape must be waded through, along with exorbitant fees footed to obtain permitting to reef rigs. In fact, of all the decommissioned rigs, somewhere around two-percent have actually made their way to the bottom — ultimately providing new aquatic sanctuary.
Salt Water Sportsman
My topwater sloshed mindlessly until the waterlogged Spook muttered Uncle. Other “can’t miss” favorites followed with nary a nip. Seems I was staring a no-hitter directly in the snoot.On occasions fish shut down, seemingly growing tired of popular offerings. No matter the reason, when a fish’s fancy turns finicky show them something a bit off the beaten path.
Salt Water Sportsman
“Dead zones” occur in the most of the world’s oceans. These massive plumes are devoid of life as nothing is capable of surviving there. Most fishermen have heard of the Gulf of Mexico’s Dead Zone, but few understand what it actually is. Here are the basics...The Mississippi River serves as the drainage basin for over forty-percent of the continental United States. As such, the aggregate runoff and seepage makes its way into the Mississippi where it’s carried downstream and into the Gulf of Mexico.
Salt Water Sportsman
As temperatures begin to chill, fish start easing into their pre-winter pattern. Cooler temps bring occasionally unstable weather which can turn the bite on like no other time of the year.One of the hottest spots in early Fall are “flushes.” Flushes are aquatic features where freshwater is infused into salt following heavy rains. These include spillways, run-offs, seeps (i.e., where water seeps in through an ill-defined, flat, generally weed infested natural drain), man-made drains, ditches, culverts, and the like.
Salt Water Sportsman
Summer’s feverish soft plastic bite has begun to fade as winter’s chill sets in. Retreating water temperatures dictate slower presentations as a fish’s metabolism turns sluggish. As fishing days grow shorter, try these incremental adjustments to improve your fish catching quotient.
Salt Water Sportsman
Some folks who chase speckled trout are hesitant to throw tandem rigs. Whether it’s the stigma of them being "gimmick baits," beginner’s lures, or give the feeling that you're cheating—sometimes if you’re not throwing one you’re missing the boat. Tandem rigs can produce when trout turn single baits down. Here are ten compelling reasons to give them a toss.1. Chill’in. In chilly water, tandem rigs offer a slower presentation (fall rate) than single baits by splitting the weight between baits. As such, they work independently of each other.
Salt Water Sportsman
South Louisiana is being invaded by multi-colored flesh eaters.
Salt Water Sportsman
When conditions turn breezy, and the water clarity churns, changing tactics can turn rough water into smooth sailing.
Salt Water Sportsman
This year's winners in the Open Class was the Pennyless, captained by Alex Burgess of Lake Worth, Florida (103.5 pounds).
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